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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/11/2021 in all areas

  1. Here are a couple of field-trails-wanabees that love to travel in our Elite II. They’re English Setters for the non-bird dog audience. We hunt ruffed grouse together.
    4 points
  2. Hello sir. Thanks for responding. I live in midland Texas. Our trials are March and April in spring and September through December in fall. Trials are held in remote locations. Usually no hookups. Shade seldom available. Have seen events temps reach 95. Have stayed with 2 wetcell batteries as you are correct battery life here is short. I also will be traveling to upstate New York for vista with relatives. Not too concerned about high temps in New York. Very sure the 4 seasons trailer is best for me. I am a little technically challenged. Would love to show photos of my dogs just not sure how to
    4 points
  3. Craig - Thanks to both you and Patriot for the kind words. The 12 volt outlet that I used is THIS. I mounted this to the underside of the Builtright rack with double sided 3M VBR tape. Then I drilled a small hole in the bottom of the Ford's dash tray to feed the outlet's wires through and attached the negative to a bolt (to ground to the frame of the truck) that is located directly below the tray. Then I ran the power wire down to the 12 volt outlet that is in the Ford's dash and spliced into the power wire coming out of the back of that socket. All of this is fairly easy as lon
    3 points
  4. The "bulldog coupler" is the connection point bolted on the trailer. The bulldog coupler connects to the Anderson trailer hitch ball which is slid into the "receiver" on the tow vehicle. When you hook up that the "Bulldog Coupler" is lowered down onto the "Anderson Hitch Ball" as shown below: That picture of the hookup is from John Davies...(thanks for the great post John.) Have fun with your new Ollie. CS
    3 points
  5. Hitch parts definition based on your pix...you'll be fine and we hope to see you on the road some day.
    2 points
  6. Not to throw any more fuel on your “worry fire”, but you also need to be thinking about how to make your Ram look less tempting to a casual smash and grab thief. That is probably a good subject for a new thread, but basically try not to leave anything unusual or valuable exposed. At the very least, a dark blanket over the top of loose gear is a good start. Heavy window tint is good, but I don’t like that method. Removing the rear seats entirely and installing secure storage lockers is much better but big $. You can go crazy with window anti-theft film and extra door locks ... https://expeditio
    2 points
  7. Hey John, If I come up with a way to test a low velocity approach I'll do it, but I don't have a low velocity fan at the moment. I do agree that low velocity kept on or run longer should work better. 🤔 I'll try a similar test (with the same fan) using the ductwork as that's not hard to do either, but my guess is that's not going to be effective at moving the temps that much either - just good to have a comparison. Ultimately, as @Mcb alluded to with the light bulb approach, heat strips might be the optimal way to solve this particular problem but I will have to take my time with that
    2 points
  8. I used rustoleum spray paint after a light sanding to remove flaking or bubbling paint. After sanding, remove dust and oil (from hands) with a rag dampened with mineral spirts...let air dry before spraying paint ( make sure to let rags with mineral spirits air dry for a few days before putting in trash (possible fire ) . I used a heavy grease pushed down into gear area of openings. I used a lighter oil for hinged moving parts. The 303 on the seal of the lid and plastic covers.
    2 points
  9. Well, I gave JED's idea a try and the results were "mixed". I used a 400 CFM inline fan mounted on a piece of plywood that fit over the dinette seat hatch. I ran the fan for 10 minutes once per hour and monitored my temp sensors around the Ollie. In general, the cabin temp dropped dramatically and the humidity came up just as dramatically. The cabin dropped about 8 degrees each time I ran the fan and the humidity came up about 25% each time as well (expected as temps go down). In addition, the basement temps came up (dramatically) in the curb side basement (warm air was being pulled in) a
    2 points
  10. That's a very good looking dog. Is it an English Pointer? We travel with three dogs. We find that in warmer temps, if we need to be away from them for shorter (one to two hours) periods of time it's best to leave them in the trailer with the air conditioner running on the generator. In colder weather, under the same time constraints, we just leave the furnace on low. We've been doing it this way for 13 years and it has never been a problem. Here's Reacher, Rocky and Lucy...
    2 points
  11. Now that I have the Garmin 890 installed along with the Builtright rack for the dash tray on the Ford (150 or 250), here are a couple of pics. Hardwiring the 12 volt/2 slot USB that used 3M double sided tape to attach to the underside of the Builtright rack was a bit un-nerving but not really difficult - let me know if you want details. With the adjustable RAM mount I can move the GPS to a more comfortable position as compared to my old GPS which actually had to sit up on the dash a bit too far away to make changes on the fly. And, even given the weight of the 890, the RAM mounts hold t
    2 points
  12. We are all wishing you well. Take a night off, or, two, to breathe and relax and recharge. This is a really big change, but many others have done it. You're as capable as most, even if it's all new. None of this is rocket science . I would also like to add my sympathies for the loss of your brother. And, for the deteriorating health of your mom. You'll be fine, eventually. Keep your head up and clear. You have friends here that you've never (personally) met. Sherry
    1 point
  13. Perfect thanks for the info.
    1 point
  14. Welcome to the group! We normally fill our tanks at a Tractor Supply, or other supplier that charges by the pound instead of "flat rate fill." 20 lb tanks are easier to handle. Tractor supply attendants will not lift the tanks out for you. A spare is easy to carry in the truck bed, if necessary. (Always contained/strapped to insure it stays upright.) We camp in shoulder season, not winter, if we can avoid it. 🙂 I've never really spent much time monitoring our propane usage, as we refill when one bottle empties. In an Elite with just 2 batteries, usually without hookups, I'm more con
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. Thank you, I am all done with this for now, I think. Just gonna try to finish packing and errands and chill the rest of the day and maybe tomorrow. I cannot BELIEVE I "lost" that hitch pin thingy! I looked everywhere. Sigh. I think like you said, when I SEE this stuff, hands-on, it will make sense. Visual! I will figure it out.
    1 point
  17. You can buy a hitch pin lock at Tractor supply in Hohenwald if you don't find it before you leave. It may turn up. We have one milk crate in the back where we keep all the setup items. (Blocks, chocks, locks, water hose and filter.) You will also find organizing easier when you actually get to use your Oliver, and see how all the pieces fit.
    1 point
  18. Our third taillight has had its issues over the 13 years, requiring resealing every 3 years or so. This year, it developed some hairline cracks, as well. We decided to remove and replace the lens. Ours was held mostly by (probably 4200) adhesive, and a few dabs of epoxy. The adhesive loosened with a heatgun on low in the attic, and a plastic scraper. The epoxy was mostly mechanical, plus heat. And not fun. We broke the lens in several places removing it. We installed the new lens from Oliver with a bed of grey butyl tape. Since that's not truly an adhesive, Paul added 6 small stainl
    1 point
  19. Bill, Fantastic install ...thanks for posting. I would like some more info on the 12V adapter. Did you wire in a USB/12V outlet plug into that upper tray? I'd be interested in knowing the part for that plug. Craig
    1 point
  20. It will all make a lot more sense when you see the system put together. You can try your hitch lock without the hitch. Run it through the holes in the "square thingy," your truck's "receiver, to make sure it's long enough, and whether it's the right diameter for the hole drilled in your receiver.
    1 point
  21. All: some day I will look back on all this and laugh. I am already laughing at myself. Need a clue bat upside the head, I do. They probably sell clue bats on Amazon. Heh. I drive to pickup the Elite one in 10 days. The OTT people will be laughing too, I’m sure. “So, you’ve NEVER towed anything, have a new truck that can launch missiles, don’t understand your new truck’s features yet, and don’t know anything about hitches and couplers and receivers and locks. Well played!” Haha
    1 point
  22. SherMica, If you camp somewhere and leave your camp to drive off...you may want to consider adding a lock for the whole coupler like this one from Progressive Industries. (The big yellow thing the rep is telling you to buy is another form of this type of "Wholer Coupler Lock". They are hard to defeat (compared to other locks) but they are not cheap. We use this lock for peace of mind when we leave our trailer alone and take our truck out sightseeing. The model for the 2" coupl the Progressive Industries 2178-B: *B stands for Bulldog Coupler* https://www.provenlocks.com/co
    1 point
  23. You may still want to purchase the Reese ball lock, or something like it, for use when you are camped. Most of us do. It's one more key to carry, but one more lock to make your trailer a slightly less attractive target. The ball bearing John suggested is a good idea, and no key. But it's not readily visible, and would drop out if the lock on the bulldog collar were defeated.
    1 point
  24. Easily. Even in 90 degree temps I think you could hang meat inside. The issue is the noise from the AC. Kicking in an out during the night isn’t very restful. We shut it off whenever possible. The ability to control humidity is what we enjoy the most.
    1 point
  25. 1 is fine, as long as it fits into your receiver OK. Try it now to make sure. 2 is extra fine, but you need a better lock for it. Your storage unit lock is probably junk. This one is very good, not the best but a hell of a lot of lock for the money. .... Stanley high security padlock ... I have been using one for four seasons and it is most excellent. 3 isn't that just like number 1? 4 no, you don’t need that. If you are super concerned about somebody lowering the coupler onto a smaller ball and driving away, buy a hardened 2” steel ball bearing ($10) and lock it into the couple
    1 point
  26. You say you want to secure the trailer while it is still hitched to your truck. What you have purchased will do that. The lockable hitch pin ensures someone can‘t easily remove it. The collar lock ensures someone can’t easily open the bulldog hitch and remove your trailer from the ball. I don’t think your nice rep understood your question. The yellow Reese lock is for when you are unhitched to secure the bulldog hitch. You can use the collar you purchased for both situations, both when hitched to your truck and in combination with the yellow Reese lock (or any number of others) when unhi
    1 point
  27. Bill, Thanks for the great write up on the Garmin 890 and install. We placed our order for the 890 and look forward to possibly a similar install. - David
    1 point
  28. Thanks for the feedback guys. I figured for sure it was the board or the igniter. Like I said the thermostat initiated the furnace and the blower went on. The last thing I thought it would be was the T-stat. Well I did a reset on my T-stat today and the thing fired up I could hear the infighter and the flame. Here's a screenshot of the procedure. Wish I knew why this happened. Peter
    1 point
  29. I would suggest making it as simple as possible and based on 12V with three temp sensors, one each in both basement sides as well as the coach. Using an Adruino unit or Raspberry pi one could program the device to turn each side on/off independently when the basement temps are either high or low and the coach temp is in a beneficial range. An automated control could be done with < 3watts when idle and 5-10 watts when all of the fans are running.
    1 point
  30. Roughneck 24 Gal - Outside Dimensions 26.000 in. L x 18.500 in. W x 17.000 in. H Inside Dimensions 20.000 in. L x 14.500 in. W x 15.000 in. H
    1 point
  31. Is there a measurement index for the ELITE I? I can’t seem to locate one. Carl
    1 point
  32. Interesting test, but I suspect your results may be due to your choice of fan. 400 cfm is a whole lot of air. My medium Vornado portable is about 300 cfm. Their large model for a 100 ft wide room is 500. In summer that might work great for making a breeze in the cabin, but for heating, a low flow will work better. Can you repeat your experiment with a much much smaller fan running all day? I don’t know enough about the physics to be able to predict the results, but I do know that plastic (your water lines and tanks) is a really poor heat conductor. Blowing high velocity air across them for a s
    1 point
  33. Interesting. Did you have the warm duct air running into the basement at the same time as the fans? Do you think that the moist air in the basement can be “drier” if the temperature is increased by the air from the ductwork? if the object is to keep pipes from freezing using electricity, it might be worth trying running an extension cord with a clamp light equipped with a 150w bulb into the basement.. There are crawl spaces under old houses throughout Maine that use that technique to prevent pipes from freezing.. might help an Ollie in NC🙂
    1 point
  34. Yes, we have the one-piece cast iron grate. Our Oliver manual calls it the D21. The new grommet works with the hole and grate, same way as the original.
    1 point
  35. Welcome to the forum. Where do you live? Where do you plan to camp? What truck? We need dog pictures. 😉 If you can’t easily find shade on blistering hot days, you should not pick the lithium battery option, those very expensive batteries can be damaged by long term exposure to excessive heat. Buy the AGMs, or if you are OK with the hassle of maintaining them monthly, the regular “wet” lead acid batteries. John Davies Spokane WA
    1 point
  36. I don't think that it is sail switch either. I've never had this issue with the furnace but have had a similar issue with the fridge. I solved it by taking compressed air - a can of THIS kind of stuff is sufficient. Be careful to NOT blow back towards the needle valve but do blow out around the burner, the igniter, and up the flue. It doesn't take much dirt, dust, bug stuff to cause a failure on that igniter sensor. BIll
    1 point
  37. From the light code. you are getting it doesn't sound like the sail switch, but you can time the blower run just to be sure. No light off would be the ignitor (spark) or gas supply (more than likely the valve) or the circuit board that makes them dance.
    1 point
  38. I found this site, with several types of tonneau covers that work with toolboxes. Even Diamondback makes one. Pricey, though. https://www.autoanything.com/tonneau-covers/20A50299A1.aspx
    1 point
  39. Read a little more carefully, it looks like you are getting the flame sense falt. The thing to troubleshoot would be are you getting ignition and it is the sensor or is ignition not happening? John's link goes into viewing the flame - but you should also be able to hear the light off.
    1 point
  40. As far as the fit of the fan shroud base I chose to use a technique I found on utube. This was a fan I installed on a Nissan NV 2500 build but would be pretty much be the same on others . I cut 1/8 inch thick aluminum strips to go on top of the plastic to reinforce the base. I used mastic ( keep this in fridge until ready to use if it is hot outside...it will become a ticky mess if not kept cool/cold before use)and dicor self leveling caulk. I wanted to make sure the fan was not going to leak especially if the fan base became brittle in years to come. Overkill but I sleep well knowing I did e
    1 point
  41. Here are pictures of the gear broken in pieces. And a picture of the new one beside it. The new one is better built. I order an extra one to keep on hand. I replaced the gear the hard way from inside. Remove the arms that raise the lid and used a very small socket w/Phillips bit. It is tight but doable. I cleaned, painted and lubricated all the metal arm parts. I also cleaned the rubber seal and applied 303 to protect it. I found it was sticking with dirt, grime, etc and believed that this may have contributed to the gear failure by cause stress on the gear when first opening after sitting fo
    1 point
  42. Thanks! Great idea to give a try! I can test how this works with a fan mounted on a piece of plywood that fits over the access hatch under the dinette seat. I'll set it up and see how it moves the temps around the basement. If there are still some dead areas that stay cold I may be forced to use the ducts as I have those set up and targeted specifically at the problem areas. The entire basement really needs some heat all around as the plumbing wraps around 3/4 of the trailer. The battery compartment is staying surprisingly warm and looks like it won't need any venting specifically for
    1 point
  43. I am soon to be a new owner to a Oliver (previously only had a pop-up trailers) and I have a insurance question to everyone. When you insure your Oliver, is it just insurance from your automobile insurance company or do you need to buy insurance like homeowner insurance. If it is like homeowner insurance, what are the major companies that handle this type of insurance (that are reasonable to work with). Thanks Richard
    1 point
  44. Bill, what a nice installation, it looks slick! FYI about map updates, do them often. They come out about every three months. When installing, look at Options and choose to install a copy on your computer. Their BaseCamp PC or Mac mapping application works pretty well for a free app, but any updated maps have to go onto your computer as well as your device. https://support.garmin.com/en-US/?faq=vxmflP3DAk2ajAJSmzVSW6 Map files are huge, try to delete older ones off your computer rather than just letting them accumulate. The new one that goes onto your device over-writes the
    1 point
  45. Yes, since I already have the Garmin Express program on my computer due to the nuvi2797, it was easy to bring that program up, plug in the new 890 to the computer and add the new device (the 890) to the list of Garmins I have. From there the "Express" program automatically checks for both GPS software and maps updates. In my case, both were needed. However, instead of this process taking a couple of hours to update, as was the case with my 2797, the 890 only took about 1/2 hour. These RAM mounts are really nice. I have used them in the past on various motorcycles but never before in t
    1 point
  46. I agree, the Sirocco ll fans are tops! I did not want a permanent mount, so I used heavy duty Velcro to secure the fans (His and Hers) in optimum locations to maximize their use and be more obscure. One over each bed at the cabin rear and another curbside at mid-cabin (see pic) to better serve the galley and dinette areas, as needed. If you look closely, the white Velcro to secure the rear curbside fan is hardly noticeable. The fans are stowed in the attic when not in use or underway. I did alter the wiring to facilitate use of the 12v female lighter sockets of proximity. The rear street side
    1 point
  47. We had these on our boat and were one of the first mods to the Oliver. They work great.
    1 point
  48. My single Caframo located in the rear curbside corner works extremely well and it sips power (0.35 amps on High). Normally it is pointed down a few degrees and rotated in a 45 degree angle toward the street bed, where my wife sleeps. We both sleep head to the front, so we get the air on our faces. Even on Low or Medium speed she gets plenty of air, I get enough leakage to stay comfortable. If I am camping alone I point it towards my side. I highly recommend this fan, you could always install two and both have full control, though as noted above they are not remote control. Yes they are pr
    1 point
  49. I seem to remember that John Davies installed a caframo fan. I'll see if I can find the post for you. I'd probably recommend a pair of Caframo Sirocco II fans if I were in your situation. The Sirocco model has been around for decades, highly rated by users, and tested and recommended by Practical Sailor. The Sirocco fan does not have a remote, but it has a timer with three settings, and moves a lot of air for .38 amps on high. It can fold up and out of the way when not in use, and offes 360 degrees of directional airflow adjustment. Mounting hardware included. https://www.practical-
    1 point
  50. Any 3/4 ton pickup will work fine without the Andersen hitch, choose whatever brand and 4wd model you like best. If you want to know about engines, search past topics here since this gets discussed about every couple of weeks.... there is an active “How many mpgs towing” thread, have you looked at that yet? Fuel economy is only a fairly small part of the overall ownership picture. I personally like the newer Ram 2500 trucks. Choose a nice interior because you will spend many long hours sitting inside, looking at it. Drive them all, choose your favorite, then shop for the best deal on it.
    1 point
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