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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/24/2020 in Posts

  1. Here's a photo from Harris Beach State Park in Brookings during a warm stretch between Xmas and new years a few years ago - so many nice little islands and sea stacks! And one from just north of there by Cape Ferello (this is from last week)
    9 points
  2. We are spending another week at Chantilly Farms in Floyd, Va. Friends joined us! Hopefully future Ollie owners. A Blue Ridge Parkway photo at Ground Hog Mountain. “The Beast” did an outstanding job as our new TV, very happy with the Tremor so far. Happy Camping!
    8 points
  3. Jason Essary OTT Service put us in touch with Xantrex tech support. We were walked through a system reset. No further issues. It was undetermined what caused the error code (4). Xantrex tech support was outstanding. All is well. edit- documented everything and everyone we talked with should this issue occur again when out of warranty. Happy Camping! Patriot
    7 points
  4. We have lived in several states mostly due to career upward mobility moves with our former employers. We found the state we enjoy living in most is where we are right now. We love the beautiful temperate spring and fall, the long summers and short easy winters of Western North Carolina. We feel very fortunate and blessed to be able to choose where we could eventually build our home and retire. Here in the foothills of Western NC we might get one snow fall of 5” and with a few days it’s gone. So no shoveling or plowing of driveways, or driving and slipping on ice! Very little snow and ice cov
    6 points
  5. We’re jazzed that the weather is looking great for our beach trip! Starting Sunday and returning on Wednesday. This will be our first time camping right on a beach so we are really looking forward to it. We’ve never been to Edisto Beach; Folly Beach further to the north has been our favorite. We don’t camp right on the beach there but the campground at nearby James Island County Park is awesome. Anyway I hope to post here again after this trip. Keep safe everyone. - Brian
    5 points
  6. We have no experience camping in the southwest, yet. Only 2 cents I can add is to suggest the River View RV Resort that is right across the river from Natchez, MS in Vidalia, LA. We were there a couple weeks ago because hubs wanted to stay somewhere with a view of the Mississippi. The place is spotless, sites are spacious, and the rates were amazingly low. I must admit it was fun to watch the barges go by. https://www.riverviewrvpark.com/ If you go, request site #2.
    5 points
  7. When you put it that way, I have to promote Salt Lake City, population 200,000. Before I retired recently, I did a lot of work to recruit people to the University of Utah. My major pitch was about the collaborative scientific community, but my pitch was also was about the lifestyle in SLC as a small city. Low traffic, walkable, bikeable, 45 mins to ski areas in winter or great hiking in summer. Climate with all four seasons, but not too hot or cold in summer or winter, with very low humidity that tempers the climate extremes. It is the largest city in the state, so it has a vibrant restaurant
    5 points
  8. January is a good time to visit parts of the southwest. We plan on leaving the first week in January to spend all of January in Arizona and then possibly do some southern Utah before coming home. John’s advice is good. January in southern AZ is good, January in northern AZ can get dicey. Flagstaff and even Sedona to some degree will have lots of snow off and on. Southern UT and NV are usually good but can have some occasional weather. Elevation increases cold and precipitation. You haven’t said what kind of camping you do. We avoid commercial RV parks and stay at state and national
    5 points
  9. You need to understand one thing about off season travel in this area..... elevation elevation elevation! The South Rim is at 7000 feet and arriving there in Feb will put you in the dead of winter, snow, and sub-freezing temps. They do keep it accessible. I don’t know if the campgrounds still operate that time of year. In 1980 I camped there two nights in January in a van, the temperature never got above 10 degrees F. The North Rim at 9000 feet is even worse, the roads do not even get cleared until late May. You will have to stay down low. Moab area should be fine, it is desert and aroun
    5 points
  10. Here is an updated graph of LE2 towing mileage; the update includes responses in this thread or additional references that I found in the archives. Data are summarized in this PDF: LE2 Towing Mileage (Table).pdf For illustration purposes, I've aggregated data by general vehicle and engine type (see graph below). The "n" value is the number of mileage data in a group; the higher the number the more reliable the average (although this case the number of data are insufficient to be statistically significant). Nonetheless, these mileage estimates likely fall in the ballpark of what on
    5 points
  11. Looks the part, I think... Comparing the tread to the Michelin’s, I have to say that there’s not a huge difference in the size of the tread blocks or the siping, so I’m feeling pretty good about the highway potential. I ended up getting a free tire for my Raptor as part of the deal. I had asked them when they put on the new tires to save me one for a 2nd spare and when I went back today to have it mounted on the rim I got, they told me I’d bought the wrong sized rim, which was odd, since the rim was a pretty much new Raptor takeoff I got on eBay. Turns out that they had act
    5 points
  12. Nature is a complete menagerie of moving things - plant's that reach out - that's the appeal..... As for overall cost of living - TN is hard to beat. Seems real estate has gone crazy most everywhere we "once" considered in our retirement planning. I have come to realize - the grass isn't always greener on the other side of the state line -err - fence - so to speak. And like SH - low population density is an attraction for us. This summers wanderings throughout CO was in stark contrast to the people numbers of the same trips 10 years back! Amazed at the traffic, congestion, and shee
    5 points
  13. Interesting thread. Where we live in the Texas Hill Country north of San Antonio has some advantages for RVer’s. We have mild winters with no sustained below freezing weather, so no need to winterize. We do usually get a week of night time temperatures in the 20’s but usually well above freezing during those days. Being right on I-10, it’s an easy two day drive to Arizona, Colorado or the Florida panhandle. If you are young and ambitious those can also be done in a day. San Antonio is in the top 10 largest US cities so has all the cultural, medical, sports, airport and shopping that
    5 points
  14. FYI you can avoid that “fun” by purchasing aluminum at a specialty metals supplier rather than plain low carbon steel. No rust, and much lighter. https://alcobrametals.com/product/1-2-x-081-3003-aluminum-expanded-flattened/ You could get stainless steel but that is overkill for dog claws and two square feet would cost $50. John Davies Spokane WA
    4 points
  15. Doggy preparedness: 1. A dog first aid kit & book. 2. Skip getting a pretty rug for inside the door. Get two turf-like/shoe-scraper ones, one for outside & one for inside. Grass & sand will still get beyond them, but not as much. 3. Cordless stick vacuum. You don't want the little short ones because the exhaust sends into orbit what you're trying to suck up. 4. A broom with a small head. I found a great one at the dollar store. 5. These towels because, like our dogs, terry cloth never dries. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00RSQH0N4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apap_nShgB
    4 points
  16. My advice: resist the temptation to buy too much stuff that you won't use.
    4 points
  17. We stayed at James Island State Park in late February this year . We really enjoyed it. We had a spot that was very close to the beach. You could hear the waves and walk on the beach. It was pretty convenient to Charleston. We did a carriage ride and trip to Fort Sumpter among other things. Pre covid Charleston had a street fair one Sunday per month that was awesome and very dog friendly. We also stayed at Hunter Island a little further south. James Island was nice and was not very crowded in February!!!. It was our first campground after David Crockett. It was one of our favorites on
    4 points
  18. Thought I would follow up on this thread. Our Oliver Elite II is #104 manufactured in 2015. We have a SAFE-T-ALERT RV propane alarm under our dinette. It just began to alarm last month at approximately 5 years of age. The End of Life (EOL) signal began to beep and I reset the alarm which silences it for 3 days. After 3 days it occurred again and the the EOL light once again came on. Per the front panel the EOL will not mute after 30 days. I was able to find a replacement alarm (30-442-P) on Amazon with a manufacture date of March 17, 2020 (so they are shipping new alarms). I removed t
    4 points
  19. A couple weeks ago, while at a Harvest Host in Atkins, AR (Paw Paw's Pecans-Great place!) we met a couple from FL who were moving to Wichita, KS to be centrally located for traveling. I'm fairly sure I failed to disguise the "are you crazy!?" look on my face. (The aeronautical industry took my brother there 40+ years ago. He agrees. 🤓)
    4 points
  20. That really sums it up, right there! I am very fortunate, and VERY grateful all this is happening. Been through a buncha years o’ sheer hell I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy. No lie. So excited. Still have tons of questions and no time to read much right now. Apologies in advance for asking stuff that is probably already answered and easily Googled. I am a web nerd (one of many hats), but damn there is a LOT to read up on and learn and I’m trying not to “overthink” but that too is one of my charms. Ha. Thanks again to ALL. I really hope to attend a meet up. Or run into some of you - well, no
    4 points
  21. We were in Hohenwald for service Oct 4-7. The 1st night we camped in the sales office parking lot. They have several power pedestals to use. There were three other campers there with us & one was a couple scheduled for a factory tour. While Oliver had our Ollie, we stayed in Linden at the Commodore Hotel. It is an historic building on the main drag. The room/bldg needs some love but was clean. The Commodore allows pets & a continental breakfast is included. The Meriwether Lewis campground was still closed.
    4 points
  22. I had a similar problem this summer, with water leaking inside the hull from the outside shower unit. The insulation below was wet, and water was coming out of the seep holes. When the shower valves were open, there was water coming out of the hole in the photo. I found part numbers from the manufacturer’s web site, and then found parts on Amazon. Replacement Vacuum Breaker. https://www.amazon.com/Fontana-97022-006-DB-Replacement-Vacuum-Breaker/dp/B015Q89WCM Replacement Straight Nipple, Seal Collar and O-Rings. https://www.amazon.com/Fontana-97020-080-DB-Repl
    4 points
  23. In 2019 we traveled to the SW from the Pacific Northwest in mid-May. We had to modify our route to take us further south when a snow storm came through the Flagstaff area. Sedona was fine. We even ventured up to Payson as we wanted to see the Mogollon Rim; it got down to freezing in Payson at night, but the snow didn't reach that far south. Colorado is to be avoided in February/March unless you are prepared for cold and snow; Monarch Pass is over 11,000'. Most of the storms in the mountain and central SW originate in the PNW; if you watch what's going on there you will get a good idea
    4 points
  24. One thing not mentioned so far are the many app's and such that are almost indispensable for finding RV and camping locations. Coming from Maine - the shear amount of open and accessible public and private camping spots will be eye-opening. BLM, National and state open areas can be useful - even for a few days - and provide multiple options. while you plan - Southern UT is a great place to explore. Off the top of my head - Campendium, Ultimate Campgrounds, and the other reservation sites (rec.gov, reserve america) are great for finding the perfect spot. I am sure I missed a few.
    4 points
  25. Alright! All good information and I'm bookmarking the Home Depot pages for the crimpers and clamps. I'll note where the access holes go. I'm becoming puffed up about the ability to fix some plumbing issues myself. And in reply to John's post, this is exactly how I learned the fittings were leaking in the first place. Wet paper towels slipped under the fittings. I didn't have the blue towels but I'm sure they work better than Brawny whites I had on hand. Also, I'm the wife in this case so I give myself full permission to buy any tools we need. Ever since my husband learned he's par
    4 points
  26. I would like to point out once again that the “Wet Sides” of WA and OR are actually a fairly small percentage of the Pacific Northwest region, which stretches clear to the Northern Rockies..... It is only because most people live there that the silly “moss everywhere” public image persists. The Cascades effectively block that Pacific Ocean moisture; just twenty miles east of their crest you enter arid and semi-arid climates, with clear skies, hot summers and chilly winters. And WAY fewer people. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Northwest Certain locations like the Okanagan Reg
    4 points
  27. One REALLY effective trick to locate a mystery leak is to place a folded up blue paper “shop towel”, not a white one, under a suspected fitting. If there is a slow drip, it will show up as an easy to see dark blue spot on the light blue background. Don’t buy from Amazon, you can find them for around $2 per roll at any place that sells auto parts, including Walmart. John Davies Spokane WA
    4 points
  28. I’ve lived all over the US and the western US is top of my list when I retire. I love the area around Bend Oregon plus coast is not that far. I’d probably head south for part of winter but that is what the Ollie is for! Texas is home so I have thought about having a small place in the Hill Country for winter between Austin and San Antonio.
    4 points
  29. I know of at least one Oliver owner that will once a month lift the tires off the concrete and spin them leaving them 90 degrees from where they had been. I leave the propane lid latches undone to keep from permanently stretching the rubber pieces. This also allows the foam bumpers to expand so that when the lid is latched the bumpers are not already flattened out.
    4 points
  30. A piece of expanded metal from Home Depot ($15). Cut to size. A piece of plastic edging designed for plastic bathroom panels ($2). Four short self tapping screws into pre drilled holes in the door. We did put beveled trim washers under the screw heads to expand the gripping area. Done. The local RV dealer had screen door guards for high $80. In the Spring, with the guard approaching four years old, I probably will remove. It will then be primed and painted and reinstalled. It has developed a few small spots of surface rust. A little steel wool would remove, but how much fun would that b
    3 points
  31. I did too! But, it’s good advice. Get the basics then add as you need. Between Amazon, Camping World and Walmart getting what you need is not difficult.
    3 points
  32. Ray - site B8 for the view. It’s the best site in the CG IMHO....F/H also.
    3 points
  33. We WERE more than grateful! We even called Duke later for more TV advice... now our new F150 is awaiting the partner who is scheduled to come "home" mid-December. Thanks to Chris and Duke who were very helpful and friendly. Today we sold the "SOB" (some other brand) and are planning the tin shed building for the Ollie.
    3 points
  34. If at 2:00 AM that water was to freeze, you would go from level to full standing saying, " what the neck was that?" Or something close...
    3 points
  35. Here's something that I've been carrying around with me while on the road and using a lot lately. Seems I'm either trying to get/stay in shape or work out an elbow or shoulder pain. These are lightweight and if creative, you can get in a full low impact weight workout. Manificent Resistance Bands Set, Heavy Duty Workout Bands, Exercise Bands, Fitness Tube Bands, 150 LBS with Handles, Door Anchor, Leg Straps, Mini Band for Men Women at Home Workout, Weight Training
    3 points
  36. As a kid my Dad and I went to Edisto and the surrounding area fairly often. Absolutely no one was there and I was a fierce pirate 🏝️. Things have changed but it is still a very nice beach. Have fun! Bill
    3 points
  37. Look at it this way - you had a built in level! 😁
    3 points
  38. Try this post for an equipment list. It’s a good start. Mossey
    3 points
  39. They got the first nest, but they think there are a couple of more, and time is running out before winter, when the workers die, the queens disappear and burrow underground until spring. Yikes. Here is a wonderful article on the operation, and those very cool moon suits. https://www.wired.com/story/what-to-wear-when-youre-battling-giant-venomous-hornets/ John Davies Spokane WA
    3 points
  40. BTW if you like rock features like those concrections, also check out Salt Point SP along the NorCal coast - it has some fantastic rock features.
    3 points
  41. Search the Internet for King Tides; that is when the big surf puts on a show and crowds of people line the bluff . . . . here are a few from Shore Acres State Park. There is a nice campground at Sunset Bay, just a few miles from Shore Acres SP. From there, you can hop on the Pacific Coast Trail and hike along the bluff to Shore Acres State Park (hiking avoids the SP entrance fee). While at the park, you can explore the botanical gardens and walk down to Simpson Beach where you'll find concretions and tide pools (if the tide is out). The trail continues South, ending at Cape Arago. If you
    3 points
  42. I’ve very much enjoyed all of the posts here. Though my wife and I have the great parks and sights of UT/WY/MT on our bucket list, the comments regarding seasons and efforts to follow the best weather have provoked thoughts regarding our possibilities from home. It’s 11 hours north to Acadia and about the same south to St. Augustine. We should be able to find the weather we like between those two poles.
    3 points
  43. At this rate it won't be long before there are more Olivers. around than in Tenn. We have had snow on the southern end of the Blue Ridge in April. That's the end without guard rails. While winter is here we load a case of bottled water and carry it in the truck. We then move it into the camper when heat comes on. We also use nontoxic RV antifreeze to flush with. We also would like to pull out after the holidays, just have not done any planning as you have. Don't forget to pack some marshmallow Fluff, Moxie, and a few Whoppie Pies. You can trade them with displaced Mainers
    3 points
  44. In someone's immortal words, "you go girl"! Ya got a dog, ya got a truck and soon you'll have an Oliver. What more does one need? Bill
    3 points
  45. I've had no problems with the outdoor shower on my Oliver. But, I did have one develop a leak in a camper I owned previously. Indeed, the plastic "feeder tube" or "mixer" area of that shower had cracked thus requiring a total replacement. If you decide that you are going to replace the unit you might want to give Jason in Service a call, asking what price he'd charge for the unit. Bill
    3 points
  46. If you plan to move to the PNW, or just visit, it is important to understand the concept of microclimates. Puget Sound especially has many. Northeast of Olympic NP is the little town of Sequim (“Skwim”) which is very dry since the prevailing wind drops all the rain on the west slope rain forests. Sequim gets 23 inches, the Hoh Rain Forest gets more than 150. The wonderful San Juan Islands near the Canadian border are also dry and relatively balmy.... The systems coming in from the west have to deal with tall mountains, so they move in odd directions and come together in convergence zones
    3 points
  47. This thread makes me want to explore these areas that I have not seen. Thanks for the inspiration!
    3 points
  48. Western Oregon does have its share of ticks, rattle snakes, and poison oak. On the other hand, Oregon has a lot of great boondocking sites.
    3 points
  49. We've lived all over the US/world. PNW is hard to beat. On the west side of the mountains there are hardly any ticks, poisonous snakes, hurricanes, tornados, etc... We may all face some sort of doom in an earthquake or volcanic eruption though. Boating is awesome here, fishing (Salmon, Cod, Halibut, Tuna, etc...)/shrimping/crabbing can be interesting despite the governments' attempts to ruin it. WA/AK have no state income/capital gains tax and fairly low property taxes if that matters. Seattle/Tacoma real estate pricing is insane, and gets more insane by the minute, but there are plenty of
    3 points
  50. We also love Western NC. Lovely, friendly small towns. 4 gentle seasons. Asheville is a very fun town, with great food, craft beer and music. We don't live here year round. (No sailing), but we spend months here every year, and find it a great jumping off point for other adventures. Much closer to New England, the Midwest, and Canada. As for Colorado, it's beautiful, but never really my favorite. My sister lived in Grand junction a few years, and was thrilled when her husband was transferred. One of my college roommates moved last year from Parker, CO, to a small town in Wyomin
    3 points
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